Resources

  • This period marks one year since the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the COVID-19 crisis a pandemic. For many over the past year, the grief following the death of a loved one has been amplified by secondary losses experienced during this time. COVID restrictions, job loss, isolation, and health concerns have led to loss of connection to those nearest and has a greatly impacted one’s grief experience. Processing the impacts of these secondary losses can allow room for healing. Below are some tips that can be useful as you reflect back on this past year.

  • Mourning the loss of a loved one can impact both the individual and community. The experience of a tragic loss, including those due to homicide, suicide, and, most recently, COVID-19, often leaves communities grieving and attempting to understand the tragedy. Though each community has different needs, levels of support, and relationships between its residents, some fundamental strategies can help individuals and families begin the healing process while also joining together with others in the community.

  • The loss of a loved one can leave us in a difficult emotional space that many of us often wish to avoid. Grief can throw us into moments of shock, destabilization, and confusion, which heighten and confront us with our own vulnerability. For many, vulnerability is a frightening word as it is often associated with reliance on others and fears of others not meeting our needs.

  • As we approach 2021, the understandable desire to fast-forward through our grief and have a “clean slate” can create pressure and self-criticism about our desire to “get over” the multiple losses we have experienced this year. Whether the loss of your loved one is recent or several years ago, it is important to remember that there is no timeline for grief.

  • As we enter the holiday season, November can be emotional for those grieving the death of a loved one and especially difficult due to COVID-19. Finding gratitude and thanks this Thanksgiving season can seem more challenging than ever. Our November article provides some tips and strategies to help navigate Thanksgiving without your loved one in the hope of alleviating some of the sadness you may feel.

  • We often think that grief is something we deal with after someone we love passes away. For many, however, feelings of grief and loss occur before the anticipated death of a loved one. This article provides some tips and coping strategies to help the healing process begin even before a loved one’s death.

  • The beginning of a new school year can be stressful and overwhelming for children, families, teachers, and counselors. Adding the challenges of COVID-19 can complicate an already difficult transition.

  • Quarantine, physical distancing, and isolation have created painful obstacles for grievers as they mourn the death of their loved one.

  • Learn tips on how to talk to grieving children about the Coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19).

  • Reflecting upon the positives in life (even after tragedy) helps us to stay grounded in the concept that a death may be just one aspect of our overall life experience. The ability to compartmentalize our grief and focus on areas of life that bring us comfort or validation (parenting, work success, family support) may help us to gain perspective on our negative life events.

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